Tag Archives: Isaiah

Year A – Second Sunday in Ordinary Time – January 19, 2014 – Gospel Reflection

Isaiah 49:3, 5-6; Psalm 40:2, 4, 7-8, 8-9, 10; 1 Corinthians 1:1-3; John 1:14a, 12a; John 1:29-34

ImageGod’s word invites us to know Jesus in three ways:  first, as the servant the prophet Isaiah describes; second, as the Lamb of God, as
John the Baptist calls him, who takes away the sins of the world; and finally and most importantly, as the Son of God.  Isaiah’s servant has been formed from the womb not only to bring God’s people back to God, but also to be a light to the nations.  Jesus fulfills this prophecy by his suffering and dying for us and for all peoples.  He is truly the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world and restores us to God as beloved sons and daughters.  A disciple of Jesus is one who learns from Jesus by being with Jesus.  In learning who Jesus is, we learn who we are called to be.

Like John the Baptist in today’s Gospel, we are to bring others to the Lord by how we live our lives and by a willingness to speak about our faith in him and the difference he has made in our lives.  Do you see yourself as a true disciple of Jesus?  How do you spend time with him?

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Year A – Fourth Sunday of Advent – December 22, 2013

Isaiah 7:10-14; Psalm 24:1-2, 3-4, 5-6 (R/. 7c and 10b); Romans 1:1-7; Matthew 1:23; Matthew 1:18-24

Sacred Scripture gives us several stories about dreamers – Jacob and his son Joseph come to
Imagemind.  But the most important dreamer of all was a carpenter named Joseph.  In his dream, an angel came and spoke to him and said, “Do not fear to take Mary into your home.  For it is through the Holy Spirit that this child has been conceived in her.”  In addition, in his dream, Joseph was told to name the child Jesus, which means “God saves.”  When he awoke from the dream, he did what had been asked and took Mary into his home.

That was not the end of his dreams though.  They kept coming.  Voices spoke, “Joseph, take the mother and child into Egypt – Herod is trying to kill him.”  “Joseph, take the mother and child out of Egypt – Herod is dead.”  Each time Joseph listened to his dreams.  Perhaps once one begins to live in God’s dream; it becomes clearer, if not easier.  God’s dream is that we live in the world as God’s children, taking care of each other and working to bring God’s peace, justice, mercy, and forgiveness – God’s very presence, wherever it is needed.

How are you living God’s dream?  

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Year A – Third Sunday of Advent – December 15, 2013 – Gospel Reflection

Isaiah 35:1-6a, 10; Psalm 146:6-7, 8-9, 9-10 (R/. cf. Isaiah 35:4); James 5:7-10; Isaiah 61:1 (cited in Luke 4:18); Matthew 11:2-11

ImageIsaiah is the prophet of joy in Advent.  He pictures a dry desert that will blossom and flower when the Lord comes.  He then images the healing that the Lord will also bring: feeble hands strengthened, weak knees made firm, blind eyes opened, deaf ears made clear, the lame leaping, and the mute singing for joy.  This is the jubilation that accompanies the coming of the Lord.  God wants all of us to have fullness of life.  It will surely come in God’s good time.  Even now, we get a taste of it, knowing that by our Baptism, we have entered into the life of the Trinity, and by receiving the Eucharist, we enter into communion with the Lord and each other.

For the fullness of joy, we must wait patiently, as James reminds us, not complaining but with hearts trusting in God’s promises.  The rest is only a matter of time.  While Jesus praises John as more than a prophet, nevertheless he concludes by saying, “Yet the least in the kingdom of heaven is greater than he.”  Even now we are children of the kingdom.

How have you known the joy that is a gift of the Holy Spirit?

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Bare Minimum Checklist for Heaven

An excellent homily for the 2nd Sunday of Advent, Year A, from Father John Reutemann of the Archdiocese for the Military Services, USA, titles “Bare Minimum Checklist for Heaven.”  Do these things, and you will go to heaven!  

http://www.reutepriest.com/2013/12/08/bare-minimum-checklist-for-heaven/

Image

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Year A – Second Sunday of Advent – December 8, 2013 – Gospel Reflection

Isaiah 11:1-10; Psalm 72:1-2, 7-8, 12-13, 17 (R/. cf. 7); Romans 15:4-9; Luke 3:4, 6; Matthew 3:1-12

Advent is a season that set before us visionaries like the poet-prophet Isaiah, the preacher-missionary Paul, and the herald-prophet John the Baptist.  Each offers us a vision of God’s good creation coming together in unity.  For Isaiah, it is all creation – human and animal; for Paul, it is the church in Rome “thinking in harmony with one another;” for John it is the Promised One coming to gather the good wheat into his barn, God’s harvest, which is the children of the kingdom.

We are brought together each Sunday to think, live, pray, and sing in harmony to the gracious God who continues to come to us in Jesus Christ, the One who came in the power of the Holy Spirit, an who continues to come in God’s Word and in the Sacrament of the Eucharist.  The risen Lord draws us more deeply into communion with the Father and with one another.

How can you help bring about God’s dream for a renewed and unified creation?

Image

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Year A – First Sunday of Advent – December 1, 2013 – Gospel Reflection

Isaiah 2:1-5; Psalm 122:1-2, 3-4, 4-5, 6-7, 8-9; Romans 13:11-14; cf. Psalm 85:8; Matthew 24:37-44

Having something to look forward to brings hope into our lives.  Having something good coming in our future helps us to move through difficult times and to bear suffering more peacefully.  Advent begins by holding up what believers have to look forward to at the end of time, and at the end of one’s own time on earth.  The prophet Isaiah expresses it as people gathering on God’s holy mountain to be instructed by God and to live in peace.

In the second reading, Paul instructs us that “our salvation is nearer now than when we first believed” so we should “conduct ourselves properly as in the day.”

In the Gospel, Jesus also calls us to live in a way expectant of the Second Coming of the Son of Man.  He warns that it will come “at an hour you do not expect.”  This notion brings fear to some, but for those who conduct themselves properly and live as God has commanded, the Second Coming brings something to look forward to with great hope, life in peace with God for eternity.

Do you live trusting that something; rather, Someone good is coming?  If you are fearful, take this time of Advent to reflect on how you can change your outlook to a feeling of hope and anticipation for the Second Coming of our Lord, Jesus Christ, for none of us know when he will return, and none of us know when our time on earth will come to an end.  Let us all come into the right relationship with Him so that we may trust in His coming peace.

Image

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized